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Connor Kopchick

The Con-Artists Guiding U.S. Foreign Policy

Just like the global economy, the media, and party politics, foreign policy is largely run by a cadre of wealthy and highly educated elites who attract the criticism of outsiders. Not all criticism is created equal however, with the foreign policy establishment attracting the ire of those running the gamut of worldly acumen. Since 9/11,…

Putin’s Not Pausing for a Victory Lap

On May 17 Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as Special Counsel in charge of the FBI investigation into Russian efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election “and related matters.” Russian President Vladimir Putin however is not waiting for Mueller’s investigation to conclude. Since evading retribution for potentially hacking American…

The Saudi-Qatar Rift: The Cat Calling the Kettle a Terrorist Financier

Last week, a host of mostly Gulf Arab nations led by Saudi Arabia cut ties with Qatar citing via the Saudi Press Agency “the dangers of terrorism and extremism,” and specifically it’s funding of such terrorist groups. Some, including U.S. President Donald Trump, praised the move as a sign that the Gulf states are finally…

Milking Two Cows: Egypt’s Return to Cold War Politics

Arriving in Tel Aviv after a trip to Cairo, Defense Secretary Mattis praised the U.S.-Egyptian military-to-military relations as a solid bedrock. Just the night before, Egypt freed a U.S. aid worker, Aya Hijazi, who had been held on charges of child abuse for three years. On the surface, relations between the United States and one…

Diaspora State-Building in the Middle East

The Arab world is in a state of flux, and the destruction reshaping these societies is forcing unprecedented numbers of people to flee to the West. While pundits and politicians focus on how these newcomers are reshaping Western society, a more significant question is how this diaspora is reshaping Arab societies. The melding of national…

Diplomacy in Action: Lessons from Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an

With over a hundred Americans being held captive by North African criminals, American diplomats in Europe frantically arranged a meeting the Libyan state-sponsored bandits. The meeting took place not in 2017 but in 1786, and the diplomats in question were both future presidents, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. This meeting, the continued disagreements between Jefferson…

The Other Muslim Ban

President Trump’s first few weeks in office were marred by controversy over his executive order, called a “Muslim ban” by critics, which barred citizens of seven majority Muslim countries from the country for 90 days and indefinitely blocked Syrian refugees from entry to the United States. Despite this executive order being rejected by a Federal…

The Evolution of Sayyid Qutb: Radicalization on a Spectrum

In the West, Sayyid Qutb (Kut-Teb) is perhaps the most recognizable Islamist theorist. While it was Hassan al-Banna who founded the Muslim Brotherhood, Qutb was the most noted member. Qutb is credited with laying the philosophical foundation for every jihadist from Osama bin Laden to the assassins of Anwar Sadat. Lawrence Wright devotes the first…

Israel-Palestine Resolution and the Liberal World Order

The United States made headlines two days before Christmas by abstaining on a United Nations Security Council vote for a resolution of Israel’s settlements in the West Bank. The resolution, which the United States could have vetoed and subsequently passed, declared the Israeli settlements in the West Bank illegal under international law, and demanded an…

Lessons from Islamic History for Policymakers

When policymakers delve into the issues facing the Islamic world, in searching for a solution they would do well by examining the history of the religion. Islam has faced numerous trials and tribulations over the last 1,500 years and many of the same issues facing the umma (Muslim community) today have been repeated in centuries…

The Con-Artists Guiding U.S. Foreign Policy

Just like the global economy, the media, and party politics, foreign policy is largely run by a cadre of wealthy and highly educated elites who attract the criticism of outsiders. Not all criticism is created equal however, with the foreign policy establishment attracting the ire of those running the gamut of worldly acumen. Since 9/11,…

Putin’s Not Pausing for a Victory Lap

On May 17 Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as Special Counsel in charge of the FBI investigation into Russian efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election “and related matters.” Russian President Vladimir Putin however is not waiting for Mueller’s investigation to conclude. Since evading retribution for potentially hacking American…

The Saudi-Qatar Rift: The Cat Calling the Kettle a Terrorist Financier

Last week, a host of mostly Gulf Arab nations led by Saudi Arabia cut ties with Qatar citing via the Saudi Press Agency “the dangers of terrorism and extremism,” and specifically it’s funding of such terrorist groups. Some, including U.S. President Donald Trump, praised the move as a sign that the Gulf states are finally…

Milking Two Cows: Egypt’s Return to Cold War Politics

Arriving in Tel Aviv after a trip to Cairo, Defense Secretary Mattis praised the U.S.-Egyptian military-to-military relations as a solid bedrock. Just the night before, Egypt freed a U.S. aid worker, Aya Hijazi, who had been held on charges of child abuse for three years. On the surface, relations between the United States and one…

Diaspora State-Building in the Middle East

The Arab world is in a state of flux, and the destruction reshaping these societies is forcing unprecedented numbers of people to flee to the West. While pundits and politicians focus on how these newcomers are reshaping Western society, a more significant question is how this diaspora is reshaping Arab societies. The melding of national…

Diplomacy in Action: Lessons from Thomas Jefferson’s Qur’an

With over a hundred Americans being held captive by North African criminals, American diplomats in Europe frantically arranged a meeting the Libyan state-sponsored bandits. The meeting took place not in 2017 but in 1786, and the diplomats in question were both future presidents, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. This meeting, the continued disagreements between Jefferson…

The Other Muslim Ban

President Trump’s first few weeks in office were marred by controversy over his executive order, called a “Muslim ban” by critics, which barred citizens of seven majority Muslim countries from the country for 90 days and indefinitely blocked Syrian refugees from entry to the United States. Despite this executive order being rejected by a Federal…

The Evolution of Sayyid Qutb: Radicalization on a Spectrum

In the West, Sayyid Qutb (Kut-Teb) is perhaps the most recognizable Islamist theorist. While it was Hassan al-Banna who founded the Muslim Brotherhood, Qutb was the most noted member. Qutb is credited with laying the philosophical foundation for every jihadist from Osama bin Laden to the assassins of Anwar Sadat. Lawrence Wright devotes the first…

Israel-Palestine Resolution and the Liberal World Order

The United States made headlines two days before Christmas by abstaining on a United Nations Security Council vote for a resolution of Israel’s settlements in the West Bank. The resolution, which the United States could have vetoed and subsequently passed, declared the Israeli settlements in the West Bank illegal under international law, and demanded an…

Lessons from Islamic History for Policymakers

When policymakers delve into the issues facing the Islamic world, in searching for a solution they would do well by examining the history of the religion. Islam has faced numerous trials and tribulations over the last 1,500 years and many of the same issues facing the umma (Muslim community) today have been repeated in centuries…