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Kathryn Urban

What Meghan and Harry’s Royal Split Can Teach Us About International Negotiation

Meghan and Harry’s bombshell interview with Oprah exposed deep rifts between the young royals and Buckingham Palace over their treatment as part of the British Royal Family and their subsequent departure from royal duties. What lessons can international negotiators learn from the acrimonious circumstances surrounding the royal split?

Will Biden’s Democracy-First Agenda Extend to Haiti?

As Haiti becomes embroiled in a constitutional crisis borne out of increasingly authoritarian policies, Biden is faced with an early test of his democracy-first foreign policy. Even as plans move forward for a global democracy summit in Europe, however, the crisis in the Americas remains largely ignored.

Detangling the European Alliance: Understanding Liberal-Populist Tensions in the EU

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges for the European Union (EU), including regarding European integration. EU members have turned inward in responding to the virus, in some cases even limiting entry from Schengen Area partners. In recent weeks, however, the most publicized European fight was over the conditions attached to COVID-19 relief aid. Tensions…

Conflict in Tigray: Implications for Ethiopia’s International Standing

The ongoing fighting in Tigray is the most recent manifestation of tensions in Ethiopia over the country’s system of ethnic federalism. As Prime Minister Abiy employs force to confront regional dissatisfaction, he should consider the implications for Ethiopia’s role as a regional power and an international partner.

Reviving NATO under a Biden Presidency

The election of President-elect Joe Biden has raised hopes for a reinvigoration of transatlantic relations. But the specter of US isolationism as well as economic pressures from Covid-19 will continue to limit NATO engagement.

Clausewitz in the Age of Terror

Clausewitz’s On War remains a key text for modern military professionals. But do these 19th century theories hold water in today’s era of transnational terrorism?

Belarus: Master of the Art of Fence-Sitting

Amid popular protests demanding his resignation, will Belarusian President Lukashenko continue to balance relations with both Russia and NATO, or will economic and political realities force him to finally choose a side?

Great Power Competition in the Arctic

Under the current administration, U.S. Arctic strategy is geared almost exclusively towards the undermining of Russian and Chinese interests rather than the promotion of American ones.

Leadership Strikes Are Not a Sound Counterterrorism Policy

The policy of assassinating organization leaders — a mainstay of U.S. counterterrorism efforts — is insufficient to curbing the spread of terrorist groups or to diminishing the lethality of their attacks.

What’s Next for Hong Kong Protests? Geopolitics Will Drive China’s Response

This summer marks one full year of continuous protests in Hong Kong against encroachment by mainland China. While Beijing will prioritize indirect means of controlling Hong Kong, military force may be on the horizon if China finds appropriate justification.

What Meghan and Harry’s Royal Split Can Teach Us About International Negotiation

Meghan and Harry’s bombshell interview with Oprah exposed deep rifts between the young royals and Buckingham Palace over their treatment as part of the British Royal Family and their subsequent departure from royal duties. What lessons can international negotiators learn from the acrimonious circumstances surrounding the royal split?

Will Biden’s Democracy-First Agenda Extend to Haiti?

As Haiti becomes embroiled in a constitutional crisis borne out of increasingly authoritarian policies, Biden is faced with an early test of his democracy-first foreign policy. Even as plans move forward for a global democracy summit in Europe, however, the crisis in the Americas remains largely ignored.

Detangling the European Alliance: Understanding Liberal-Populist Tensions in the EU

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented many challenges for the European Union (EU), including regarding European integration. EU members have turned inward in responding to the virus, in some cases even limiting entry from Schengen Area partners. In recent weeks, however, the most publicized European fight was over the conditions attached to COVID-19 relief aid. Tensions…

Conflict in Tigray: Implications for Ethiopia’s International Standing

The ongoing fighting in Tigray is the most recent manifestation of tensions in Ethiopia over the country’s system of ethnic federalism. As Prime Minister Abiy employs force to confront regional dissatisfaction, he should consider the implications for Ethiopia’s role as a regional power and an international partner.

Reviving NATO under a Biden Presidency

The election of President-elect Joe Biden has raised hopes for a reinvigoration of transatlantic relations. But the specter of US isolationism as well as economic pressures from Covid-19 will continue to limit NATO engagement.

Clausewitz in the Age of Terror

Clausewitz’s On War remains a key text for modern military professionals. But do these 19th century theories hold water in today’s era of transnational terrorism?

Belarus: Master of the Art of Fence-Sitting

Amid popular protests demanding his resignation, will Belarusian President Lukashenko continue to balance relations with both Russia and NATO, or will economic and political realities force him to finally choose a side?

Great Power Competition in the Arctic

Under the current administration, U.S. Arctic strategy is geared almost exclusively towards the undermining of Russian and Chinese interests rather than the promotion of American ones.

Leadership Strikes Are Not a Sound Counterterrorism Policy

The policy of assassinating organization leaders — a mainstay of U.S. counterterrorism efforts — is insufficient to curbing the spread of terrorist groups or to diminishing the lethality of their attacks.

What’s Next for Hong Kong Protests? Geopolitics Will Drive China’s Response

This summer marks one full year of continuous protests in Hong Kong against encroachment by mainland China. While Beijing will prioritize indirect means of controlling Hong Kong, military force may be on the horizon if China finds appropriate justification.