Global Commons

Nuclear Arms Control for US, Russia, and China

Rather than holding out hope for a tripartite agreement with China and Russia, the United States should first build up bilateral arms control relationships with China and Russia individually. This includes renewing New START.

Considering Africa in the International Criminal Court

The International Criminal Court has an important role to play in international criminal justice, but urgently needs reform to maintain credibility.

Espionage and Discrimination in Science: China’s Complicated Role

China is stealing research secrets from institutions around the world. As a result, Chinese scientists are more likely to experience discrimination in research settings. Are policymakers stuck choosing between securing research and securing civil rights?

Iran, Enrichment, and Arms Control

The NPT does not grant a right to enrich, as Iran claims. However, it does allow for verification-based access to nuclear power.

It May Be Too Late to Save World Cup 2022. What Can We Do to Save FIFA?

Teaser: FIFA’s organization of the World Cup, a beloved global sporting event, masks an apparent lack of concern for human rights in the countries it partners with. How can the international community take action?

Q&A – “Science Diplomats Bring a Gender Perspective to Science Diplomacy”

Charged Affairs editor Mercedes Yanora spoke with four "science diplomats" about the importance of science diplomacy in foreign policy, and the need for greater gender representation in the field.
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From Pawns to Bishops: Ideational Forces and the Pursuit of Power

Part three of a four-part series looking at what factors allow states to punch above their weight in international affairs. This segment examines three ideational factors: identity, moral authority, and strategic positioning.
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Knights and Rooks: The Role of Geography, Resources, and Asymmetric Capabilities in Attaining Status

Editor’s Note: This article is Part II of “When Pawns Become Queens,” a four-part series that seeks to explain how less powerful states are able to rise to prominence in international politics. To start from the beginning of the series, please read When Pawns Become Queens: Becoming a Global Power. In December of 1968, North…

When Pawns Become Queens: Becoming a Global Power

Part 1 of a 4-part series on how less powerful states create outsize geopolitical impacts. This piece explores why less powerful states are under-analyzed in foreign policy theory, why this is problematic, and how it can be addressed.

The New Cold War

Russia is expanding its influence in the Arctic Circle as ice recedes and natural resources become accessible. This represents a potential threat which the US must recognize.

Facial Recognition Systems: A Tool to Combat Human Trafficking?

Walk through almost any neighborhood in Manhattan and law enforcement can trace your path, tracking your movements on the 8,000-plus cameras that blanket the city. Attend an event at Madison Square Garden and building security—and advertisers—will rely on facial-recognition technology to track attendance and prevent people believed to be threats from entering the building. Fly…

Making Elections Great Again: Why US Foreign Policy Is Threatening Liberal Democracies

Since Donald Trump’s election as President of the United States, the norms of diplomacy and international relations that many had considered settled have been revisited and redefined. Among the more striking examples are the administration’s willingness to talk to North Korea, igniting a trade war with China, and praising various authoritarian leaders. Most radically, what…