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Fellowship

Saudi Arabia: Open for Business? A few changes the Kingdom could make to improve economic growth and attract investment

Saudi Arabia has spent billions of dollars investing in big, fancy projects in an attempt to diversify its economy and create more sustainable growth for future generations. The Red Sea Project, King Abdullah Economic City, “Knowledge City”, and King Abdullah Financial District are among those developments. Some of these projects, while bold and creative, are…

Fissile Materials Must Be Controlled

On September 14, 2017, the Nonproliferation Policy Education Center (NPEC) hosted a panel with Japanese officials regarding the 47 metric tons of plutonium the Japanese government has stockpiled in the country. One of the panelists, a former US nuclear weapons designer, explained how, contrary to claims by the Japanese nuclear industry, this “civilian” plutonium (Pu-240)…

Deterrence Can Protect Our Critical Infrastructure from Cyberattack

A sophisticated computer virus swept through Ukraine in June, wreaking havoc on systems serving the private sector and shutting down critical civil infrastructure – locking several government ministries out of their files, forcing the closure of a metro system and an airport, affecting banks and ATMs, and blacking-out power stations – before spreading across the…

Why are European Countries Investing in Iran?

Post-sanctions, Iran may prove to be an emerging market for European Investors. On July 3, France’s biggest oil and gas company, Total, signed a multibillion-dollar deal to expand the development of Iran’s South Pars gas field, one of the largest in the world. This agreement is the first major oil and gas deal between a…

No One in the Wings: The Missing Successor to U.S. Leadership

In the wake of the G20 summit in Hamburg, the United States has continued to step back from its global leadership role of the past 70 years. The Trump administration’s America First policy has raised serious doubts as to the future of a liberal international order that depends on U.S. power. Unlike past predictions, today’s…

The Mental Health Crisis in Syria: A Major Gap in Humanitarian Medical Response

The civil war in Syria has led to a significant increase in the number of Syrians battling mental disorders. These include anxiety disorders, depression, post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD), and developmental problems. Humanitarian medical providers in Syria have had to scale up mental health care on an ad-hoc basis to cope with the large number of…

Iran Steadfast Amidst Saudi Provocations

Threatened by an Iran with increasing regional and international influence after the implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), a diplomatic accord struck between Iran and the P5+1 (five permanent members of the UN Security Council and Germany) in July 2015, Saudi Arabia has in the new year engaged in a trade war…

Climate Change and Poverty — The Underappreciated Link

Climate change made headlines in recent months as global leaders converged upon the United Nations Conference on Climate Change, better known as COP21, and emerged triumphantly with a climate deal. Yet for the estimated 400,000 people a year already dying from the effects of climate change, the Paris Agreement comes too late. Far from the…

The Global Refugee Crisis: Can We Ignore It Much Longer?

Conflict, persecution, and human rights violations have forcibly displaced an unprecedented 59.5 million people worldwide at the end of 2014, according to a recent UNHCR report. That figure, roughly equivalent to the population of the United Kingdom, was up from 51.2 million the previous year, already a level unseen since World War II. From 2011 to…

How the US and Europe can Fight Back Against Putin’s Information War

As the conflict in eastern Ukraine simmers, Western leaders and policymakers grow ever more concerned about Russia’s use of “information warfare.” Through social media, television, and billboards, Moscow has advanced its agenda in new and often sophisticated ways that bear little resemblance to the overdone propaganda of the Cold War.

Why The Pope Stirred The Turkish Pot

While much of the world, including the United States, has consistently failed to recognize Turkey’s World War I massacre of 1.5 million Armenians as genocide, Pope Francis’s April 12 comments made crystal clear his and the Roman Catholic Church’s stance on the matter.

How to Make a Difference Abroad: A Review of Kate Otto’s “Everyday Ambassador”

In March 2006, President George W. Bush gave a speech in Cleveland, Ohio, about his foreign policy. During the question and answer section he was asked, “[F]rom the grassroots level, how can we… promote the cause of freedom and liberty for all peoples throughout the world?” That is, how can ordinary citizens work to make…