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Oil and Stability: Good Enough to Keep the US in the Gulf?

For decades, the safe transportation of oil from the Persian Gulf has been a major security concern for the United States. But there are reasons for the U.S. to reevaluate whether it truly needs to invest military resources in protecting it.

Burkina Faso, Five Years After “Revolution 2.0”

In 2014, following 27 years of rule by President Blaise Compaoré, Burkinabe citizens took to the streets in protest of Compaoré’s decision to seek an extension of presidential term limits and resulting in his resignation. Five years after the protests, Burkina Faso has since held the national election that activists demanded. Nevertheless, challenges continue to test the country’s democratic development, including issues and delays surrounding key country-wide decisions, insecurity in the Sahel, and weak rule of law. International organizations need to capitalize on progress made to date and continue supporting democratic growth in Burkina Faso.

Walled Gardens: Google’s Misstep Highlights Threats to Internet Freedom

On Tuesday, December 11th, 2018, Google CEO Sundar Pichai found himself testifying in front of the House Judiciary Committee. Subjects discussed ranged from artificial intelligence to political bias to manipulation of search results. Project DragonFly was also on the table, though Pichai was quick to dismiss the endeavor. He told the committee that Google has…

Venezuela and the Risk of “Democratic” Coup D’états

Venezuela continues to face political and economic turmoil. The Chavista regimes of Venezuelan Presidents Hugo Chavez and Nicolas Maduro cracked down on the media and political opposition. The economic situation in the country is, if possible, even more dire, with the International Monetary Fund recently suggesting that inflation rates could reach one million percent this…

Do not be Disappointed if the North Korea Talks Go Nowhere

Since the Korean ceasefire was signed in 1953, North Korea has continued to be a thorn in the United States’ side. Multiple diplomatic standoffs – including the 1968 seizure of the USS Pueblo and the 2003 North Korean withdrawal from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) – have engendered distrust between the two states. The June…

Keep Your Friends Close: The Case for NATO

Recent NATO summits have been tense. Since his presidential campaign, President Trump has repeatedly hammered the other NATO members for not contributing adequately to the alliance. This streak of criticisms, spun as a means to get other NATO members to contribute more, has only served to drive a wedge between the United States and the other…

Oil and Stability: Good Enough to Keep the US in the Gulf?

For decades, the safe transportation of oil from the Persian Gulf has been a major security concern for the United States. But there are reasons for the U.S. to reevaluate whether it truly needs to invest military resources in protecting it.

Burkina Faso, Five Years After “Revolution 2.0”

In 2014, following 27 years of rule by President Blaise Compaoré, Burkinabe citizens took to the streets in protest of Compaoré’s decision to seek an extension of presidential term limits and resulting in his resignation. Five years after the protests, Burkina Faso has since held the national election that activists demanded. Nevertheless, challenges continue to test the country’s democratic development, including issues and delays surrounding key country-wide decisions, insecurity in the Sahel, and weak rule of law. International organizations need to capitalize on progress made to date and continue supporting democratic growth in Burkina Faso.

Walled Gardens: Google’s Misstep Highlights Threats to Internet Freedom

On Tuesday, December 11th, 2018, Google CEO Sundar Pichai found himself testifying in front of the House Judiciary Committee. Subjects discussed ranged from artificial intelligence to political bias to manipulation of search results. Project DragonFly was also on the table, though Pichai was quick to dismiss the endeavor. He told the committee that Google has…

Venezuela and the Risk of “Democratic” Coup D’états

Venezuela continues to face political and economic turmoil. The Chavista regimes of Venezuelan Presidents Hugo Chavez and Nicolas Maduro cracked down on the media and political opposition. The economic situation in the country is, if possible, even more dire, with the International Monetary Fund recently suggesting that inflation rates could reach one million percent this…

Do not be Disappointed if the North Korea Talks Go Nowhere

Since the Korean ceasefire was signed in 1953, North Korea has continued to be a thorn in the United States’ side. Multiple diplomatic standoffs – including the 1968 seizure of the USS Pueblo and the 2003 North Korean withdrawal from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) – have engendered distrust between the two states. The June…

Keep Your Friends Close: The Case for NATO

Recent NATO summits have been tense. Since his presidential campaign, President Trump has repeatedly hammered the other NATO members for not contributing adequately to the alliance. This streak of criticisms, spun as a means to get other NATO members to contribute more, has only served to drive a wedge between the United States and the other…