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Defense & Security

Why Would Turkey Need Nuclear Weapons?

Recent comments made by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan have stoked fears that Turkey might pursue nuclear weapons. So why would Turkey need nuclear weapons, and how serious was Erdogan?

Oil and Stability: Good Enough to Keep the US in the Gulf?

For decades, the safe transportation of oil from the Persian Gulf has been a major security concern for the United States. But there are reasons for the U.S. to reevaluate whether it truly needs to invest military resources in protecting it.

The Iran Cables and Beyond: A Conversation with Murtaza Hussain

Managing Editor Mike Sexton spoke with The Intercept's Murtaza Hussain about the recently released Iran Cables investigative piece -- and what they tell us about the region's future.

Did Russia Achieve its Goals in the Sochi Summit?

President Putin’s Sochi Summit brought an unprecedented number of African leaders to Moscow, developing Russia’s prestige as a supplier of arms to the continent and rattling the U.S. foreign policy establishment.

Is U.S. Credibility Really in Danger?

Last month, the US moved its troops out on the Syrian-Turkish border out of the way of an impending Turkish incursion against Kurdish forces. Did the US lose its credibility as a result of this decision?

Beyond Migration: Humanitarian Assistance to the Northern Triangle

President Trump has tied humanitarian aid to migration outcomes in the Northern Triangle, yet foreign assistance affects underlying causes of migration to the United States. More importantly, predicating future aid on migration outcomes goes against fundamental humanitarian principles and US values.

Phones and Force: The Geostrategy of Smartphones in an Era of US-Chinese Competition

Smartphones will gain geostrategic significance. The Gulf States, through Apple and Huawei, have aligned with the United States and China, respectively. Their strategic importance makes them noteworthy test cases in the rising geostrategic significance of supply chains.

Conflicting Values in the Arctic: Examining Russian-Canadian Tensions through Election Interference

A forthcoming study from the University of Calgary predicts that Russian intelligence services may be interfering in the Canadian federal elections scheduled to take place at the end of October over concerns in the Arctic region.

Hurricane Season…Here We Go Again

The annual hurricane season is here and once again devastating the Caribbean. Regional enforcements and integration can help save lives in both the short and long-term.

Ethiopia’s Abiy One Year On

A year after his election Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy is being challenged to continue his role as a regional mediator while resolving ethnic tensions at home. How he responds to this popular ultimatum may well shape his legacy.

Maritime Security on the Korean Peninsula: The Story of the Northern Limit Line

North Korea denuclearization may provide a path to ending violent clashes along the Northern Limit line, a long disputed maritime demarcation between North and South Korea.

Shrimp vs. Whale: South Korea’s Response to Japan’s Trade Restrictions

Japan and South Korea are locked in a tit-for-tat trade dispute after Japan levied trade restrictions on Korea’s biggest industry. The new restrictions have galvanized the Korean people, fraying high-Level ties between the two nations and sparking the grassroots Boycott Japan Movement in South Korea.

Embracing Multilateralism in the DRC Ebola Crisis

The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a humanitarian crisis that could spread, made worse by DRC’s instability. The UN – supported by Member States – is best positioned to address this crisis.

Iran in the Time of Maximal Compellence

The United States' strategy of maximal compellence against Iran is frustrating, but not yet compelling. To reduce the risk of war, the Trump administration needs to soften and broaden its approach.

Book Review: Why America Loses Wars

YPFP Fellow Stephan Delaney reviews "Why America Loses Wars," by noted military historian Dr. Donald Stoker.

ISIS Fighters Will Be Punished for Their Actions. Their Children Need Our Protection.

From repatriation, to direct services, to assurances from their home countries that they will be treated with dignity, the children of ISIS fighters can be one step closer to escaping their parents’ horrible choices with help from governments and the international community.

Finding Peace Between the Wickets: Cricket Diplomacy in India and Pakistan

Given their shared love of cricket, India and Pakistan should find a way for their respective leagues to collaborate in a bid to thaw relations, improve infrastructure, and reap financial gain.

Iran, Enrichment, and Arms Control

The NPT does not grant a right to enrich, as Iran claims. However, it does allow for verification-based access to nuclear power.

Foreign Aid Should Persuade, Not Coerce

The Trump administration has demonstrated a willingness to use foreign aid to coerce countries like El Savador into adopting favorable policies. But what are the long-term consequences of this approach?

Tariffs Won’t Stop Chinese Influence in Latin America

Sen. Rick Scott claims that tariffs on China can combat rising Chinese influence in Latin America but this would only serve to increase Chinese influence in the Americas.