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Defense & Security

Reviving NATO under a Biden Presidency

The election of President-elect Joe Biden has raised hopes for a reinvigoration of transatlantic relations. But the specter of US isolationism as well as economic pressures from Covid-19 will continue to limit NATO engagement.

European Defense: Rhetoric vs. Reality

A new round of Franco-German debate has once again raised the question of European strategic autonomy as current efforts to increase defense capabilities have largely failed to live up to their potential.

IDS International CEO: Biden’s Foreign Policy Will Seek To Undo Damage To Alliances, Institutions

Charged Affairs Staff Writer interviewed IDS International CEO Nick Dowling -- an acknowledged expert in the foreign policy and security spaces -- on what President-Elect Biden's foreign policy will look like.

Clausewitz in the Age of Terror

Clausewitz’s On War remains a key text for modern military professionals. But do these 19th century theories hold water in today’s era of transnational terrorism?

Big Tech Should Pay Publishers

Big tech is eroding quality journalism. In July, Australia put forward a draft framework to save it. It is past time for similar measures to be implemented in the United States.

Why the West Must Remain Engaged in Bosnia

Twenty-five years after its devastating war, Bosnia and Herzegovina remains deeply divided by religion and ethnicity. Young Bosnians, however, are more likely to cross divides. Membership in NATO and the European Union would buttress their efforts.

Great Power Competition in the Arctic

Under the current administration, U.S. Arctic strategy is geared almost exclusively towards the undermining of Russian and Chinese interests rather than the promotion of American ones.

How To Beat The Cartels Without Firing a Shot

If the U.S. is serious about reducing cartel violence in Mexico and drug trafficking into the U.S., then it needs to revise its policy away from securitized efforts, like the Mérida initiative, and support efforts for socio-economic development

Leadership Strikes Are Not a Sound Counterterrorism Policy

The policy of assassinating organization leaders — a mainstay of U.S. counterterrorism efforts — is insufficient to curbing the spread of terrorist groups or to diminishing the lethality of their attacks.

ISIS Is Not Resurging, but It May Be Evolving

Although ISIS numbers remain well under 2017 levels, recent attacks have demonstrated a new pattern of well-organized, multi-faceted strikes on police and military targets.

Peace through the Space Force: How Washington Must Assert Itself Today and Tomorrow

The United States must prepare for a future in which outer space is a theater for great power competition.

Searching for Diplomacy in Libya

Even as actors in Libya’s civil war push for an end to hostilities, the entrenched economic and geo-political interests of international actors seem to preclude lasting peace. Unless the international community rethinks its priorities, a diplomatic solution may not be possible.

Pressuring Friends: Recent Developments in the ROK-US Alliance

Since October several key issues—defense cost sharing and GSOMIA in particular—have caused contention in the United States-South Korea alliance. Rising pressure provides room for adversaries to exploit the alliance for their own gain and draws into question the many benefits of a strong alliance.

An Ecosystem Approach to Child Dignity and Safety Online

In this interview, Dr. Joanna Rubinstein, CEO of Childhood USA, discusses the sexual abuse of children online. She advocates for a global system approach when combatting such violence.

North Korea and the United States: No Exit?

Arms talks between the United States and North Korea have been stalled since February 2019, and now that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has declared an end to his self-imposed nuclear weapons and missile testing moratorium there’s little immediate hope for talks to continue.

Book Review: Everything You Have Told Me is True

Everything You Have Told Me is True brings an updated in-country perspective to the shadowy role of Islamist militant group, al-Shabaab, in Somalia. From Mogadishu to London, and through interviews with refugees and terrorists alike, she explores al-Shabaab’s immense resilience, begging the question: is al-Shabaab here to stay?

A Failed Multilateral Consensus on Women, Peace, and Security

NATO is now five years out from the institution of its women, peace, and security action plan. How has the trans-Atlantic treaty organization pursued the WPS agenda, and what shortcomings still remain?

A Return to Militarism: The Symbolism of Recent North Korean Missile Tests

As the year comes to a close, North Korea's new nuclear missile tests should heighten security concerns for the United States and place pressure on the Trump Administration to change strategies.

Why Would Turkey Need Nuclear Weapons?

Recent comments made by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan have stoked fears that Turkey might pursue nuclear weapons. So why would Turkey need nuclear weapons, and how serious was Erdogan?

Oil and Stability: Good Enough to Keep the US in the Gulf?

For decades, the safe transportation of oil from the Persian Gulf has been a major security concern for the United States. But there are reasons for the U.S. to reevaluate whether it truly needs to invest military resources in protecting it.