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Defense & Security

Big Tech Should Pay Publishers

Big tech is eroding quality journalism. In July, Australia put forward a draft framework to save it. It is past time for similar measures to be implemented in the United States.

Why the West Must Remain Engaged in Bosnia

Twenty-five years after its devastating war, Bosnia and Herzegovina remains deeply divided by religion and ethnicity. Young Bosnians, however, are more likely to cross divides. Membership in NATO and the European Union would buttress their efforts.

Great Power Competition in the Arctic

Under the current administration, U.S. Arctic strategy is geared almost exclusively towards the undermining of Russian and Chinese interests rather than the promotion of American ones.

How To Beat The Cartels Without Firing a Shot

If the U.S. is serious about reducing cartel violence in Mexico and drug trafficking into the U.S., then it needs to revise its policy away from securitized efforts, like the Mérida initiative, and support efforts for socio-economic development

Leadership Strikes Are Not a Sound Counterterrorism Policy

The policy of assassinating organization leaders — a mainstay of U.S. counterterrorism efforts — is insufficient to curbing the spread of terrorist groups or to diminishing the lethality of their attacks.

ISIS Is Not Resurging, but It May Be Evolving

Although ISIS numbers remain well under 2017 levels, recent attacks have demonstrated a new pattern of well-organized, multi-faceted strikes on police and military targets.

4 Reasons Why Women’s Equality Should Be at the Forefront of the G7

For the past two years, the G7 host countries championed issues of equality. Now, the United States has the power to create meaningful change as the host of this year’s G7!

Trusting the Enemy: Barriers to Diplomacy in US-North Korea Relationship

As the United States-North Korea relationship becomes more complex, a key hurdle for the two nations to address is a growing lack of trust. Addressing this lack of trust in the relationship can create a situation in which diplomacy can be effective.

For a True ‘Geopolitical Commission’ the EU Must Put Its Money Where Its Mouth Is

The outcome of the EU's negotiations around its next long-term budget will have a pivotal effect on the bloc's ambitions to become a stronger geopolitical actor on the global stage. To make these ambitions a reality, the bloc's leaders must reconsider their spending priorities.

China’s Penghu Island Annexation Shows Taiwan Was Never Too Far Off

The Chinese Navy has surrounded the Penghu Islands, located kilometers off the Taiwanese coast. Seen as a warning and a rebuke to Taiwan’s recent rapid foreign policy shift away from China, this piece examines what China might want and how Taiwan can respond.

Phones and Force: The Geostrategy of Smartphones in an Era of US-Chinese Competition

Smartphones will gain geostrategic significance. The Gulf States, through Apple and Huawei, have aligned with the United States and China, respectively. Their strategic importance makes them noteworthy test cases in the rising geostrategic significance of supply chains.

Conflicting Values in the Arctic: Examining Russian-Canadian Tensions through Election Interference

A forthcoming study from the University of Calgary predicts that Russian intelligence services may be interfering in the Canadian federal elections scheduled to take place at the end of October over concerns in the Arctic region.

Hurricane Season…Here We Go Again

The annual hurricane season is here and once again devastating the Caribbean. Regional enforcements and integration can help save lives in both the short and long-term.

Ethiopia’s Abiy One Year On

A year after his election Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy is being challenged to continue his role as a regional mediator while resolving ethnic tensions at home. How he responds to this popular ultimatum may well shape his legacy.

Maritime Security on the Korean Peninsula: The Story of the Northern Limit Line

North Korea denuclearization may provide a path to ending violent clashes along the Northern Limit line, a long disputed maritime demarcation between North and South Korea.

Shrimp vs. Whale: South Korea’s Response to Japan’s Trade Restrictions

Japan and South Korea are locked in a tit-for-tat trade dispute after Japan levied trade restrictions on Korea’s biggest industry. The new restrictions have galvanized the Korean people, fraying high-Level ties between the two nations and sparking the grassroots Boycott Japan Movement in South Korea.

Embracing Multilateralism in the DRC Ebola Crisis

The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a humanitarian crisis that could spread, made worse by DRC’s instability. The UN – supported by Member States – is best positioned to address this crisis.

Iran in the Time of Maximal Compellence

The United States' strategy of maximal compellence against Iran is frustrating, but not yet compelling. To reduce the risk of war, the Trump administration needs to soften and broaden its approach.

Book Review: Why America Loses Wars

YPFP Fellow Stephan Delaney reviews "Why America Loses Wars," by noted military historian Dr. Donald Stoker.

ISIS Fighters Will Be Punished for Their Actions. Their Children Need Our Protection.

From repatriation, to direct services, to assurances from their home countries that they will be treated with dignity, the children of ISIS fighters can be one step closer to escaping their parents’ horrible choices with help from governments and the international community.