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Diplomacy & International Institutions

Restarting Nuclear Talks

The nuclear talks between the United States and North Korea (DPRK) seemed to have stalled. The meeting that was originally scheduled for early November in New York City was cancelled at the last minute. Some are speculating that that this is due to disagreement over the interpretation of the Singapore declaration. This should have been…

Through the Looking Glass – ASEAN-EU Relations in a New Era

The Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM) summit last October marked the 40th anniversary of the formal relations between the European Union (EU) and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The biennial event, which gathered more than fifty heads of state, offers a unique platform for these two regional bodies to exchange their shared goals and differences.…

Actually a European Army Could Be in the UK’s Post-Brexit Interest

Back in 2016, during the campaign leading up to the United Kingdom’s referendum on EU membership, The Guardian published an article entitled “Is there a secret plan to create an EU army?” The article addressed Eurosceptic claims that the European Union was en route to the creation of unified armed forces, and that these plans…

Whatever Happens, the EU Must Respect the Spitzenkandidat Process

As elections for the European Parliament are now less than 6 months away, Brussels is buzzing with the question that everyone wants answered: who will be the next President of the European Commission? With the center right European People’s Party (EPP) leading the polls, and the left-wing Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D) in…

Europe and the Day After the INF Treaty

In 1977, the Soviet Union deployed in its western territories the SS-20 Saber, an intermediate-range ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead and the capacity to reach Western Europe. The move precipitated an arms race and arms control negotiations, culminating in the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty between the Soviet Union and the United States.…

Renewing US-Turkey Ties

The Middle East has been important to the United States’ strategy since the 1940s and throughout the Cold War. As a member of NATO, Turkey held a special place in the region as one of the United States’ closest allies. Turkish and American soldiers fought side by side in the Korean War, and Turkey has…

Russia’s Baltic Cyber Campaign Leaves NATO Endangered

Russia is constantly on the offensive in the Baltic region, seeking to undermine the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) through cyber intrusions and targeted disinformation efforts. To help bolster this front line and secure their own domains, the Baltic countries of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania need to work together, sharing cyber capabilities and understanding. Russian…

President Trump’s Incoherent Foreign Policy Strains Alliances

“October surprises” are traditionally reserved for American election politics, but this October both the Saudi-Khashoggi Affair and the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) beg to redefine the phrase. While unconnected, both cases are the newest additions to the ongoing exhibition of a confounding U.S. foreign policy. An aggressive and inconsistent…

Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons

Nuclear technology-sharing deals requires that recipient states be trustworthy. Providing nuclear power technology to Saudi Arabia is dangerous.

The Case for More South Asian Regionalism

While so much of the world embraced globalization by drawing closer together regionally, countries in South Asia barely began to exploit this strategy of international cooperation and prosperity. Despite containing India’s emerging power, two potential hydro giants, Bhutan and Nepal; the prospective sea-trading states Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka; and the appealing tourist destination of…

Turmoil in Bulgaria brings the EU’s rule-of-law problem into sharper relief

Recent protests in Bulgaria have unveiled the country's long-standing problems with corruption and the rule of law, in the latest example of the EU's issue of anti-democratic regimes among its member states. If the bloc does not take action to address these concerns, its legitimacy could be compromised.

How To Beat The Cartels Without Firing a Shot

If the U.S. is serious about reducing cartel violence in Mexico and drug trafficking into the U.S., then it needs to revise its policy away from securitized efforts, like the Mérida initiative, and support efforts for socio-economic development

Trump wants to expand the G-7. Is he right?

In his announcement postponing the 2020 G-7 summit to this fall, Donald Trump made it known that he wishes to add Russia, Australia, South Korea, and India to the group. An evaluation of this proposal reveals that while the idea of an expanded G-7 may be a good one, only Australia and South Korea are currently good candidates for membership.

In Kim’s Neighborhood: Regional Actors and US-DPRK Relations

Building off prior Charged Affairs articles, a co-authored article diving into the details of South Korea, Japan, and China's regional role in North Korea relations.

Coercive Coal: Chinese Energy Investment in Developing Countries

Chinese coal power investment increases the vulnerability of developing countries to Beijing’s coercive leverage.

Make America Righteous Again

As with the Civil Rights Movement before them, the Black Lives Matter protests affect American foreign policy. The U.S. Government can look to that era as an example for how to apply diplomacy domestically and internationally.

Europe’s Dangerous China Dependency

A string of recent events has revealed the pitfalls of Europe’s economic dependence on China. In order to stand up for its democratic values, the EU must weaken Beijing’s ability to leverage trade and investment ties in service of its hostile political objectives.

WHO Defunding Threatens Pillars Of U.S. Comprehensive National Power

By defunding the WHO, the U.S. is threatening both its alliance system and adherence to the value of multilateral institutions, both critical to its long-term comprehensive national power.

4 Reasons Why Women’s Equality Should Be at the Forefront of the G7

For the past two years, the G7 host countries championed issues of equality. Now, the United States has the power to create meaningful change as the host of this year’s G7!

A Liberal Defense of Nationalism

Identification with one’s nation has often been a liberating force. It is vital to distinguish between those forms of nationalism that are compatible with liberal values, and those that are not.