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Diplomacy & International Institutions

What Prospects for a Eurodeterrent?

As the European strategic autonomy debate has heated up over the past few years, there has been increasing discussion about the idea of a pan-European nuclear deterrent. Yet numerous obstacles stand in the way of realizing this ambition in the short- to medium-term.

Reviving NATO under a Biden Presidency

The election of President-elect Joe Biden has raised hopes for a reinvigoration of transatlantic relations. But the specter of US isolationism as well as economic pressures from Covid-19 will continue to limit NATO engagement.

European Defense: Rhetoric vs. Reality

A new round of Franco-German debate has once again raised the question of European strategic autonomy as current efforts to increase defense capabilities have largely failed to live up to their potential.

IDS International CEO: Biden’s Foreign Policy Will Seek To Undo Damage To Alliances, Institutions

Charged Affairs Staff Writer interviewed IDS International CEO Nick Dowling -- an acknowledged expert in the foreign policy and security spaces -- on what President-Elect Biden's foreign policy will look like.

Forthcoming ICC Order on the Jurisdiction in the Palestinian Territories – a Beginning of the Court’s End?

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is seized with a request for a ruling the extent of its jurisdiction. The result of this decision will have implications on the whole institution's future.

Why the West Must Remain Engaged in Bosnia

Twenty-five years after its devastating war, Bosnia and Herzegovina remains deeply divided by religion and ethnicity. Young Bosnians, however, are more likely to cross divides. Membership in NATO and the European Union would buttress their efforts.

Great Power Competition in the Arctic

Under the current administration, U.S. Arctic strategy is geared almost exclusively towards the undermining of Russian and Chinese interests rather than the promotion of American ones.

Turmoil in Bulgaria brings the EU’s rule-of-law problem into sharper relief

Recent protests in Bulgaria have unveiled the country's long-standing problems with corruption and the rule of law, in the latest example of the EU's issue of anti-democratic regimes among its member states. If the bloc does not take action to address these concerns, its legitimacy could be compromised.

How To Beat The Cartels Without Firing a Shot

If the U.S. is serious about reducing cartel violence in Mexico and drug trafficking into the U.S., then it needs to revise its policy away from securitized efforts, like the Mérida initiative, and support efforts for socio-economic development

Trump wants to expand the G-7. Is he right?

In his announcement postponing the 2020 G-7 summit to this fall, Donald Trump made it known that he wishes to add Russia, Australia, South Korea, and India to the group. An evaluation of this proposal reveals that while the idea of an expanded G-7 may be a good one, only Australia and South Korea are currently good candidates for membership.

Whatever Happens, the EU Must Respect the Spitzenkandidat Process

As elections for the European Parliament are now less than 6 months away, Brussels is buzzing with the question that everyone wants answered: who will be the next President of the European Commission? With the center right European People’s Party (EPP) leading the polls, and the left-wing Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D) in…

Europe and the Day After the INF Treaty

In 1977, the Soviet Union deployed in its western territories the SS-20 Saber, an intermediate-range ballistic missile with a nuclear warhead and the capacity to reach Western Europe. The move precipitated an arms race and arms control negotiations, culminating in the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty between the Soviet Union and the United States.…

Renewing US-Turkey Ties

The Middle East has been important to the United States’ strategy since the 1940s and throughout the Cold War. As a member of NATO, Turkey held a special place in the region as one of the United States’ closest allies. Turkish and American soldiers fought side by side in the Korean War, and Turkey has…

Russia’s Baltic Cyber Campaign Leaves NATO Endangered

Russia is constantly on the offensive in the Baltic region, seeking to undermine the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) through cyber intrusions and targeted disinformation efforts. To help bolster this front line and secure their own domains, the Baltic countries of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania need to work together, sharing cyber capabilities and understanding. Russian…

President Trump’s Incoherent Foreign Policy Strains Alliances

“October surprises” are traditionally reserved for American election politics, but this October both the Saudi-Khashoggi Affair and the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty (INF) beg to redefine the phrase. While unconnected, both cases are the newest additions to the ongoing exhibition of a confounding U.S. foreign policy. An aggressive and inconsistent…

Nuclear Power and Nuclear Weapons

Nuclear technology-sharing deals requires that recipient states be trustworthy. Providing nuclear power technology to Saudi Arabia is dangerous.

The Case for More South Asian Regionalism

While so much of the world embraced globalization by drawing closer together regionally, countries in South Asia barely began to exploit this strategy of international cooperation and prosperity. Despite containing India’s emerging power, two potential hydro giants, Bhutan and Nepal; the prospective sea-trading states Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka; and the appealing tourist destination of…

Can Trump Jump-Start a New Relationship with Russia?

“Foolishness and stupidity!” is how President Donald Trump has characterized previous U.S.-Russia foreign policy while bemoaning relations that have “NEVER been worse.” Trump’s approach to Russia might be unorthodox, but it is gaining some converts as several Republican senators have traveled to Russia ─ even meeting with Konstantin Kosachev, chairman of the Russian Federation Council…

Taiwan’s Bad News from the Western Hemisphere

Since the end of the Chinese Civil War, the official “state” of China has been in flux as a result of the One China policy. While Mao Zedong won the Chinese Revolution in 1950, the Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalists fled to the island of Formosa. Since this time, the country has lived under the One China…

Mein Gott! Would Germany Build a Bomb?

In August 2018, an article was published in The National Interest suggesting that Germany should develop its own nuclear arsenal. Since the 2016 U.S. presidential elections, the idea of Germany developing its own, or a “European,” nuclear deterrent has appeared in policy discussions both inside and outside of Germany. Every time this was in reaction…