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Fellowship Program

The United States Needs a Quantum Computing Investment Strategy

Advances in quantum computing stand to revolutionize the way the world does business more than any innovation since the computer itself. The United States needs a coordinated strategy to develop, harness, and secure this game-changing technology.
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How To Beat The Cartels Without Firing a Shot

If the U.S. is serious about reducing cartel violence in Mexico and drug trafficking into the U.S., then it needs to revise its policy away from securitized efforts, like the Mérida initiative, and support efforts for socio-economic development
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Book Review: Everything You Have Told Me is True

Everything You Have Told Me is True brings an updated in-country perspective to the shadowy role of Islamist militant group, al-Shabaab, in Somalia. From Mogadishu to London, and through interviews with refugees and terrorists alike, she explores al-Shabaab’s immense resilience, begging the question: is al-Shabaab here to stay?
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Book Review: Shrewd Samaritan: Faith, Economics, and the Road to Loving Our Global Neighbor

In his latest book titled Shrewd Samaritan- Faith, Economics, and the Road to Loving Our Global Neighbor, Bruce Wdyick explores diverse impacts of how to effectively and intentional give to the global poor.
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Ebola: Stubborn and Stigmatized

YPFP Fellowship Editor Danielle Preskitt spoke with Concern Worldwide's Kirk Prichard about the ongoing Ebola crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
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Book Review: Why America Loses Wars

YPFP Fellow Stephan Delaney reviews "Why America Loses Wars," by noted military historian Dr. Donald Stoker.
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ISIS Fighters Will Be Punished for Their Actions. Their Children Need Our Protection.

From repatriation, to direct services, to assurances from their home countries that they will be treated with dignity, the children of ISIS fighters can be one step closer to escaping their parents’ horrible choices with help from governments and the international community.
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Both Parties Agree: The House’s FY2020 NDAA Is Politicized. Why That Matters.

While the Democrats and Republicans are unlikely to come to a full agreement on who politicized the normally standard National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) procedure, bipartisan finger-pointing suggests both sides agree that this breakdown in precedent is cause for alarm.
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It May Be Too Late to Save World Cup 2022. What Can We Do to Save FIFA?

Teaser: FIFA’s organization of the World Cup, a beloved global sporting event, masks an apparent lack of concern for human rights in the countries it partners with. How can the international community take action?
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Foreign Aid Should Persuade, Not Coerce

The Trump administration has demonstrated a willingness to use foreign aid to coerce countries like El Savador into adopting favorable policies. But what are the long-term consequences of this approach?
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Why a President Biden Would Not Solve Transatlantic Tensions

As the U.S. presidential election looms, it is certain U.S.-EU relations would improve under a Biden administration, however structural shifts in U.S. foreign policy make it unlikely that a change in leadership would heal all transatlantic divisions.
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Belarus: Master of the Art of Fence-Sitting

Amid popular protests demanding his resignation, will Belarusian President Lukashenko continue to balance relations with both Russia and NATO, or will economic and political realities force him to finally choose a side?
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Why Montenegro’s Recent Elections Could Spell Trouble for Europe

After a surprisingly poor showing in Montenegro’s recent parliamentary elections, the ruling pro-Western Democratic Party of Socialists could lose control of the government for the first time in three decades. A potential coalition led by the opposition Democratic Front party would seek closer ties with Russia and Serbia, undermining the geopolitical stability of the region.
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Why the West Must Remain Engaged in Bosnia

Twenty-five years after its devastating war, Bosnia and Herzegovina remains deeply divided by religion and ethnicity. Young Bosnians, however, are more likely to cross divides. Membership in NATO and the European Union would buttress their efforts.
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Lost Voices: Index, Resignations, and the State of Journalistic Freedom in Orbán’s Hungary

The current state of Hungary’s free press is tremulously withering. Recently, 70 journalists from the independent Index online news service resigned in protest because their objective reporting was becoming imperiled. Sadly, such cases are not new in Hungary.
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Turmoil in Bulgaria brings the EU’s rule-of-law problem into sharper relief

Recent protests in Bulgaria have unveiled the country's long-standing problems with corruption and the rule of law, in the latest example of the EU's issue of anti-democratic regimes among its member states. If the bloc does not take action to address these concerns, its legitimacy could be compromised.
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