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Michael Purzycki

Staff Writer

Michael has worked as an analyst in the Pentagon and at Bloomberg LP. His primary interests are U.S. defense policy, the Middle East, and energy policy. He has been published in the Washington Monthly, the Truman National Security Project, and France 24.

Oil and Stability: Good Enough to Keep the US in the Gulf?

For decades, the safe transportation of oil from the Persian Gulf has been a major security concern for the United States. But there are reasons for the U.S. to reevaluate whether it truly needs to invest military resources in protecting it.

The Case for a U.S. Foreign Legion

Eighteen years of war have strongly burdened the U.S. military. But climate change, refugee flows, and other destabilizing events will continue to heighten the risk of conflicts, at least some of which will require outside intervention to halt. The United States is still the only country with the capacity to intervene in conflicts around the globe, if it so chooses. Recruiting soldiers from around the world into a foreign legion, and granting U.S. citizenship to the legion’s veterans, as France does, can increase the U.S. willingness to use force abroad. It can also strengthen the link between citizenship and service in society, something Americans are already pondering given recent deportations of veterans.

Support the Troops: Invest in Civilian Power

Investment in civilian institutions can reinforce U.S. engagement, reinforcing a U.S. military that has been overstretched in recent years.

Tunisia’s Enduring (But Fragile) Democracy

Tunisia provides a stark rebuttal for anyone who thinks of the Arab Spring as a failure. But democratic institutions do not defend themselves; they need citizens to stand up for them.
Kosova_independence_Vienna_Red_Flag

Germany’s Recovery Gives Kosovo Hope

Parallels between Kosovo in the last twenty years and Germany in the decades after World War II provide hope for Kosovo’s future.

The United States and Saudi Arabia: Is Partnership Necessary?

Jamal Khashoggi’s death has called into question the relationship between the United States and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. When a Saudi critic and lawful permanent resident of the United States is murdered, apparently at the behest of Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman (MBS), Americans will naturally wonder whether an ostensible U.S. ally really should…

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Oil and Stability: Good Enough to Keep the US in the Gulf?

For decades, the safe transportation of oil from the Persian Gulf has been a major security concern for the United States. But there are reasons for the U.S. to reevaluate whether it truly needs to invest military resources in protecting it.

The Case for a U.S. Foreign Legion

Eighteen years of war have strongly burdened the U.S. military. But climate change, refugee flows, and other destabilizing events will continue to heighten the risk of conflicts, at least some of which will require outside intervention to halt. The United States is still the only country with the capacity to intervene in conflicts around the globe, if it so chooses. Recruiting soldiers from around the world into a foreign legion, and granting U.S. citizenship to the legion’s veterans, as France does, can increase the U.S. willingness to use force abroad. It can also strengthen the link between citizenship and service in society, something Americans are already pondering given recent deportations of veterans.

Support the Troops: Invest in Civilian Power

Investment in civilian institutions can reinforce U.S. engagement, reinforcing a U.S. military that has been overstretched in recent years.

Tunisia’s Enduring (But Fragile) Democracy

Tunisia provides a stark rebuttal for anyone who thinks of the Arab Spring as a failure. But democratic institutions do not defend themselves; they need citizens to stand up for them.
Kosova_independence_Vienna_Red_Flag

Germany’s Recovery Gives Kosovo Hope

Parallels between Kosovo in the last twenty years and Germany in the decades after World War II provide hope for Kosovo’s future.

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