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Politics & Government

Political Chaos is Knocking Down Barriers in Algeria

The lack of leadership in Algeria has led to an unstable political environment, weakening the structure of the state. An Arab-Spring inspired revolution is underway as protesters challenge the government, as well as the military who has seized political power; for now.

Foreign Aid Should Persuade, Not Coerce

The Trump administration has demonstrated a willingness to use foreign aid to coerce countries like El Savador into adopting favorable policies. But what are the long-term consequences of this approach?

Border Security in West Africa

Boko Haram in Nigeria, Haqqani Network in Pakistan, National Liberation Army in Venezuela, and Al Shabaab in Somalia - what regional similarity do they all share that allows their organizations to destabilize their regions? What major security issue must these countries address if they hope to finally defeat these organizations?

Women’s Participation is Crucial to the Success of the Afghan Peace Process

The Taliban’s inconsistent stance on women's rights, and the near-sighted goal of a quick exit by the current US administration are going to hamper the nature of the peace agreement in Afghanistan.

Exploring the ‘What If?’ in Middle East Peace

Understanding the Middle East's cartography is key to resolving the region's contemporary conflicts. The King-Crane Commission explores this "alternative history."

Demographics are not Destiny: An Interview with David Allison

YPFP Fellowship Editor Benjamin Verdi spoke with Valuegraphics founder David Allison on how data is used in polls -- and what Valuegraphics' particular approach tells us about voter "hearts and minds" around the world.

Do States Have a “Right to Exist”?

The recent resurgence of violence between Israel and Palestine brings questions of national sovereignty and a state's "right to exist" back into focus, but is it the time for philosophical questions?

Understanding the DRC’s Presidential Elections

DRC election results show one of the greatest challenges for the international community, supporting a faltering democracy while expressing concern over potentially inaccurate election results.

Tunisia’s Enduring (But Fragile) Democracy

Tunisia provides a stark rebuttal for anyone who thinks of the Arab Spring as a failure. But democratic institutions do not defend themselves; they need citizens to stand up for them.

Democracy Beyond the Liberal Order

The Civic Foundations of Fascism in Europe: Italy, Spain, and Romania, 1870-1945 Verso’s re-release of Dylan Riley’s 2010 book, The Civic Foundations of Fascism in Europe: Italy, Spain, and Romania, features a new introduction in which Riley succinctly takes on the question of whether President Trump’s authoritarian leanings qualify him as a fascist. His answer…

There’s Still Hope for Poland

Liberal democracy does not defend itself. It relies on people who value it to keep it alive. Poland deserves close attention; if democratization can be undone in the land of Solidarity, where is it safe?

Pyongyang’s Princess: The Rise of Kim Yo-Jong

Although Kim Yo-jong has taken on a prominent role within the North Korean regime, she is not poised to be a successor to Kim Jung-un.

Reviving NATO under a Biden Presidency

The election of President-elect Joe Biden has raised hopes for a reinvigoration of transatlantic relations. But the specter of US isolationism as well as economic pressures from Covid-19 will continue to limit NATO engagement.

IDS International CEO: Biden’s Foreign Policy Will Seek To Undo Damage To Alliances, Institutions

Charged Affairs Staff Writer interviewed IDS International CEO Nick Dowling -- an acknowledged expert in the foreign policy and security spaces -- on what President-Elect Biden's foreign policy will look like.

Belarus: Master of the Art of Fence-Sitting

Amid popular protests demanding his resignation, will Belarusian President Lukashenko continue to balance relations with both Russia and NATO, or will economic and political realities force him to finally choose a side?

Why Montenegro’s Recent Elections Could Spell Trouble for Europe

After a surprisingly poor showing in Montenegro’s recent parliamentary elections, the ruling pro-Western Democratic Party of Socialists could lose control of the government for the first time in three decades. A potential coalition led by the opposition Democratic Front party would seek closer ties with Russia and Serbia, undermining the geopolitical stability of the region.

Just or Unjust? Securitisation of COVID-19 and Police Brutality in Africa

The trade-off between restricting rights and freedoms and ensuring state security within the COVID-19 context has given rise to extrajudicial killings and brutality against civilians in Africa.

Why the West Must Remain Engaged in Bosnia

Twenty-five years after its devastating war, Bosnia and Herzegovina remains deeply divided by religion and ethnicity. Young Bosnians, however, are more likely to cross divides. Membership in NATO and the European Union would buttress their efforts.

What’s Next for Hong Kong Protests? Geopolitics Will Drive China’s Response

This summer marks one full year of continuous protests in Hong Kong against encroachment by mainland China. While Beijing will prioritize indirect means of controlling Hong Kong, military force may be on the horizon if China finds appropriate justification.

Qaboos to Haitham: Oman’s Uncharacteristically Smooth Transition of Power

Oman’s recent transition of power was surprisingly peaceful thanks to a few key factors and limited expectations for the new Sultan.