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Politics & Government

Populism: A Way Out

Images of migrants pouring in from conflict zones flood our televisions and smartphones.  Frustration over economic inequality is rampant in both developing and developed countries. These are but two crucial reasons for the rise in populism; a fear that is ultimately deep-seated. The current rise in populism is mostly due to an identity crisis brought…

The Catalan Threat to Spanish Democracy

Catalan separatists are effectively holding the stability of Spanish democracy hostage.

Taiwan’s Inexorable Drift from China

While China aggressively pushes for Taiwan to reunify under China, Taiwanese identity continues to decouple from Chinese identity.
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The Brexit Opportunity: How Brexit Can Re-Energize UK Development Policy

As the UK leaves the EU, there are underexplored implications for the UK’s international development policy, with Brexit providing an opportunity for the UK to reduce trade barriers with developing countries and develop a progressive unified trade and development policy.
Syria's empty seat at the Arab League

Syrian Readmission into the Arab League; Will it? Won’t it? Does it Even Matter Anymore?

As the Syrian Civil War slowly draws to a close, diplomatic, strategic and ethical questions come to the forefront of the Arab League, which will debate Syria's readmission later this month.
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Germany’s Recovery Gives Kosovo Hope

Parallels between Kosovo in the last twenty years and Germany in the decades after World War II provide hope for Kosovo’s future.

Description and the Anatomy of War

America in Afghanistan: Foreign Policy and Decision Making from Bush to Obama to Trump By Sharifullah DoraniI.B. Tauris, 328 pp, January 2019 In the winter of 1940, the philosopher Simone Weil published her essay “The Iliad, or the Poem of Force.” In it, she argues that from the violence of war “springs the idea of…

Authoritarianism’s Next Stop for Oil? Guyana!

As Venezuela's government is increasingly marginalized, China, Russia and Turkey will look to Guyana to fill natural resource needs. This poses dangers to Guyana's emerging democratic institutions.

China’s Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. The end to the U.S.—status quo?

As the US increasingly vacates its leadership role within international institutions, China seeks to fill the gap through regional institutions it dominates. This implies potential shifts in how multilateralism is practiced.

The Estrada Doctrine’s Illusion of Neutrality: How Venezuela’s Crisis Became Mexico’s Missed Opportunity

Mexico's reversion to the Estrada Doctrine of neutrality is an ethical and strategic mistake, which has resulted in a major missed opportunity for Mexico to take on the mantle of regional leadership.

There’s Still Hope for Poland

Liberal democracy does not defend itself. It relies on people who value it to keep it alive. Poland deserves close attention; if democratization can be undone in the land of Solidarity, where is it safe?

Pyongyang’s Princess: The Rise of Kim Yo-Jong

Although Kim Yo-jong has taken on a prominent role within the North Korean regime, she is not poised to be a successor to Kim Jung-un.

Reviving NATO under a Biden Presidency

The election of President-elect Joe Biden has raised hopes for a reinvigoration of transatlantic relations. But the specter of US isolationism as well as economic pressures from Covid-19 will continue to limit NATO engagement.

IDS International CEO: Biden’s Foreign Policy Will Seek To Undo Damage To Alliances, Institutions

Charged Affairs Staff Writer interviewed IDS International CEO Nick Dowling -- an acknowledged expert in the foreign policy and security spaces -- on what President-Elect Biden's foreign policy will look like.

Belarus: Master of the Art of Fence-Sitting

Amid popular protests demanding his resignation, will Belarusian President Lukashenko continue to balance relations with both Russia and NATO, or will economic and political realities force him to finally choose a side?

Why Montenegro’s Recent Elections Could Spell Trouble for Europe

After a surprisingly poor showing in Montenegro’s recent parliamentary elections, the ruling pro-Western Democratic Party of Socialists could lose control of the government for the first time in three decades. A potential coalition led by the opposition Democratic Front party would seek closer ties with Russia and Serbia, undermining the geopolitical stability of the region.

Just or Unjust? Securitisation of COVID-19 and Police Brutality in Africa

The trade-off between restricting rights and freedoms and ensuring state security within the COVID-19 context has given rise to extrajudicial killings and brutality against civilians in Africa.

Why the West Must Remain Engaged in Bosnia

Twenty-five years after its devastating war, Bosnia and Herzegovina remains deeply divided by religion and ethnicity. Young Bosnians, however, are more likely to cross divides. Membership in NATO and the European Union would buttress their efforts.

What’s Next for Hong Kong Protests? Geopolitics Will Drive China’s Response

This summer marks one full year of continuous protests in Hong Kong against encroachment by mainland China. While Beijing will prioritize indirect means of controlling Hong Kong, military force may be on the horizon if China finds appropriate justification.

Qaboos to Haitham: Oman’s Uncharacteristically Smooth Transition of Power

Oman’s recent transition of power was surprisingly peaceful thanks to a few key factors and limited expectations for the new Sultan.