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Politics & Government

Book Review: Everything You Have Told Me is True

Everything You Have Told Me is True brings an updated in-country perspective to the shadowy role of Islamist militant group, al-Shabaab, in Somalia. From Mogadishu to London, and through interviews with refugees and terrorists alike, she explores al-Shabaab’s immense resilience, begging the question: is al-Shabaab here to stay?

Mental Health Stigma and Politics: Not Even Canada Gets It Right

It is time for a change in how we talk about mental health in politics. While we have seen great progress, there are lessons in recent scandals and in actions by pundits and journalists that faced no backlash whatsoever.

Burkina Faso, Five Years After “Revolution 2.0”

In 2014, following 27 years of rule by President Blaise Compaoré, Burkinabe citizens took to the streets in protest of Compaoré’s decision to seek an extension of presidential term limits and resulting in his resignation. Five years after the protests, Burkina Faso has since held the national election that activists demanded. Nevertheless, challenges continue to test the country’s democratic development, including issues and delays surrounding key country-wide decisions, insecurity in the Sahel, and weak rule of law. International organizations need to capitalize on progress made to date and continue supporting democratic growth in Burkina Faso.

Conflicting Values in the Arctic: Examining Russian-Canadian Tensions through Election Interference

A forthcoming study from the University of Calgary predicts that Russian intelligence services may be interfering in the Canadian federal elections scheduled to take place at the end of October over concerns in the Arctic region.

Ethiopia’s Abiy One Year On

A year after his election Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy is being challenged to continue his role as a regional mediator while resolving ethnic tensions at home. How he responds to this popular ultimatum may well shape his legacy.

Both Parties Agree: The House’s FY2020 NDAA Is Politicized. Why That Matters.

While the Democrats and Republicans are unlikely to come to a full agreement on who politicized the normally standard National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) procedure, bipartisan finger-pointing suggests both sides agree that this breakdown in precedent is cause for alarm.

It May Be Too Late to Save World Cup 2022. What Can We Do to Save FIFA?

Teaser: FIFA’s organization of the World Cup, a beloved global sporting event, masks an apparent lack of concern for human rights in the countries it partners with. How can the international community take action?

Political Chaos is Knocking Down Barriers in Algeria

The lack of leadership in Algeria has led to an unstable political environment, weakening the structure of the state. An Arab-Spring inspired revolution is underway as protesters challenge the government, as well as the military who has seized political power; for now.

Foreign Aid Should Persuade, Not Coerce

The Trump administration has demonstrated a willingness to use foreign aid to coerce countries like El Savador into adopting favorable policies. But what are the long-term consequences of this approach?

Border Security in West Africa

Boko Haram in Nigeria, Haqqani Network in Pakistan, National Liberation Army in Venezuela, and Al Shabaab in Somalia - what regional similarity do they all share that allows their organizations to destabilize their regions? What major security issue must these countries address if they hope to finally defeat these organizations?

Women’s Participation is Crucial to the Success of the Afghan Peace Process

The Taliban’s inconsistent stance on women's rights, and the near-sighted goal of a quick exit by the current US administration are going to hamper the nature of the peace agreement in Afghanistan.

Exploring the ‘What If?’ in Middle East Peace

Understanding the Middle East's cartography is key to resolving the region's contemporary conflicts. The King-Crane Commission explores this "alternative history."

Demographics are not Destiny: An Interview with David Allison

YPFP Fellowship Editor Benjamin Verdi spoke with Valuegraphics founder David Allison on how data is used in polls -- and what Valuegraphics' particular approach tells us about voter "hearts and minds" around the world.

Do States Have a “Right to Exist”?

The recent resurgence of violence between Israel and Palestine brings questions of national sovereignty and a state's "right to exist" back into focus, but is it the time for philosophical questions?

Understanding the DRC’s Presidential Elections

DRC election results show one of the greatest challenges for the international community, supporting a faltering democracy while expressing concern over potentially inaccurate election results.

Tunisia’s Enduring (But Fragile) Democracy

Tunisia provides a stark rebuttal for anyone who thinks of the Arab Spring as a failure. But democratic institutions do not defend themselves; they need citizens to stand up for them.

Democracy Beyond the Liberal Order

The Civic Foundations of Fascism in Europe: Italy, Spain, and Romania, 1870-1945 Verso’s re-release of Dylan Riley’s 2010 book, The Civic Foundations of Fascism in Europe: Italy, Spain, and Romania, features a new introduction in which Riley succinctly takes on the question of whether President Trump’s authoritarian leanings qualify him as a fascist. His answer…

Populism: A Way Out

Images of migrants pouring in from conflict zones flood our televisions and smartphones.  Frustration over economic inequality is rampant in both developing and developed countries. These are but two crucial reasons for the rise in populism; a fear that is ultimately deep-seated. The current rise in populism is mostly due to an identity crisis brought…

The Catalan Threat to Spanish Democracy

Catalan separatists are effectively holding the stability of Spanish democracy hostage.

Taiwan’s Inexorable Drift from China

While China aggressively pushes for Taiwan to reunify under China, Taiwanese identity continues to decouple from Chinese identity.