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Politics & Government

Why Montenegro’s Recent Elections Could Spell Trouble for Europe

After a surprisingly poor showing in Montenegro’s recent parliamentary elections, the ruling pro-Western Democratic Party of Socialists could lose control of the government for the first time in three decades. A potential coalition led by the opposition Democratic Front party would seek closer ties with Russia and Serbia, undermining the geopolitical stability of the region.

Just or Unjust? Securitisation of COVID-19 and Police Brutality in Africa

The trade-off between restricting rights and freedoms and ensuring state security within the COVID-19 context has given rise to extrajudicial killings and brutality against civilians in Africa.

Why the West Must Remain Engaged in Bosnia

Twenty-five years after its devastating war, Bosnia and Herzegovina remains deeply divided by religion and ethnicity. Young Bosnians, however, are more likely to cross divides. Membership in NATO and the European Union would buttress their efforts.

What’s Next for Hong Kong Protests? Geopolitics Will Drive China’s Response

This summer marks one full year of continuous protests in Hong Kong against encroachment by mainland China. While Beijing will prioritize indirect means of controlling Hong Kong, military force may be on the horizon if China finds appropriate justification.

Qaboos to Haitham: Oman’s Uncharacteristically Smooth Transition of Power

Oman’s recent transition of power was surprisingly peaceful thanks to a few key factors and limited expectations for the new Sultan.

Review of Noah Feldman’s The Arab Winter: A Tragedy

Building on a renowned body of work on legal and political theory, Noah Feldman’s "The Arab Winter: A Tragedy" deftly weaves together three case studies: Egypt, Syria, and Tunisia to examine political self-determination during the Arab spring and subsequent Arab winter.

A Liberal Defense of Nationalism

Identification with one’s nation has often been a liberating force. It is vital to distinguish between those forms of nationalism that are compatible with liberal values, and those that are not.

A Proposed Kosovo-Serbia Land Swap Intensifies Europe’s Integration Challenges

In the midst of the COVID-19 outbreak, Kosovo’s government has fallen, leaving an uncertain future for the Western Balkan region. Within this context, the lack of clear U.S. opposition to a proposed Kosovo-Serbia land swap opens the door to potentially disastrous consequences for Europe as a whole.

COVID-19: How the West was Closed

If Western countries had pursued the elimination strategies to fighting COVID-19 as East Asian countries had, they could be avoiding lengthy shutdowns and high death tolls. Until western countries begin seriously adopting eradication strategies, they’ll find themselves isolated from international travel until they find a vaccine or adopt better strategies.

It’s Time to Hold Hungary Accountable

While Europe struggles to confront the coronavirus pandemic, Hungary’s government has exploited the crisis to indefinitely increase its own power. The European Union must punish Hungary for this democratic backsliding, or else risk losing its legitimacy as a community of values.

Demographics are not Destiny: An Interview with David Allison

YPFP Fellowship Editor Benjamin Verdi spoke with Valuegraphics founder David Allison on how data is used in polls -- and what Valuegraphics' particular approach tells us about voter "hearts and minds" around the world.

Do States Have a “Right to Exist”?

The recent resurgence of violence between Israel and Palestine brings questions of national sovereignty and a state's "right to exist" back into focus, but is it the time for philosophical questions?

Understanding the DRC’s Presidential Elections

DRC election results show one of the greatest challenges for the international community, supporting a faltering democracy while expressing concern over potentially inaccurate election results.

Tunisia’s Enduring (But Fragile) Democracy

Tunisia provides a stark rebuttal for anyone who thinks of the Arab Spring as a failure. But democratic institutions do not defend themselves; they need citizens to stand up for them.

Democracy Beyond the Liberal Order

The Civic Foundations of Fascism in Europe: Italy, Spain, and Romania, 1870-1945 Verso’s re-release of Dylan Riley’s 2010 book, The Civic Foundations of Fascism in Europe: Italy, Spain, and Romania, features a new introduction in which Riley succinctly takes on the question of whether President Trump’s authoritarian leanings qualify him as a fascist. His answer…

Populism: A Way Out

Images of migrants pouring in from conflict zones flood our televisions and smartphones.  Frustration over economic inequality is rampant in both developing and developed countries. These are but two crucial reasons for the rise in populism; a fear that is ultimately deep-seated. The current rise in populism is mostly due to an identity crisis brought…

The Catalan Threat to Spanish Democracy

Catalan separatists are effectively holding the stability of Spanish democracy hostage.

Taiwan’s Inexorable Drift from China

While China aggressively pushes for Taiwan to reunify under China, Taiwanese identity continues to decouple from Chinese identity.
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The Brexit Opportunity: How Brexit Can Re-Energize UK Development Policy

As the UK leaves the EU, there are underexplored implications for the UK’s international development policy, with Brexit providing an opportunity for the UK to reduce trade barriers with developing countries and develop a progressive unified trade and development policy.
Syria's empty seat at the Arab League

Syrian Readmission into the Arab League; Will it? Won’t it? Does it Even Matter Anymore?

As the Syrian Civil War slowly draws to a close, diplomatic, strategic and ethical questions come to the forefront of the Arab League, which will debate Syria's readmission later this month.