Strategy

Nonstrategic Nuclear Weapons and Deterrence

The US should deploy nonstrategic nuclear weapons to close a perceived deterrence gap and work toward arms control agreements to prevent the kind of miscalculation that could lead to global thermonuclear war.

The Case for U.S. Disengagement in Yemen

In light of the changing nature of the US-Saudi alliance, the US should withdraw support for the Saudi-led military campaign in Yemen, to alter incentive structures for further violence and help facilitate humanitarian relief.

When the Carriers Depart, What Will Happen To US Soft Power?

Political and military debates over the retirement of the US carrier fleet raises questions over what platform will fill the carrier's role in projecting US soft power.
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When Pawns Remain Pawns…

In the final part of a four part series looking at what factors allow states to punch above their weight in international affairs, Brazil’s failure to leverage key factors highlights that states can push to far in leveraging their position.
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We Must Not Allow a Satellite Gap!

Satellites have become indispensable to modern life. What would happen if this satellite system was attacked and disabled?
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From Pawns to Bishops: Ideational Forces and the Pursuit of Power

Part three of a four-part series looking at what factors allow states to punch above their weight in international affairs. This segment examines three ideational factors: identity, moral authority, and strategic positioning.
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Knights and Rooks: The Role of Geography, Resources, and Asymmetric Capabilities in Attaining Status

Editor’s Note: This article is Part II of “When Pawns Become Queens,” a four-part series that seeks to explain how less powerful states are able to rise to prominence in international politics. To start from the beginning of the series, please read When Pawns Become Queens: Becoming a Global Power. In December of 1968, North…

When Pawns Become Queens: Becoming a Global Power

Part 1 of a 4-part series on how less powerful states create outsize geopolitical impacts. This piece explores why less powerful states are under-analyzed in foreign policy theory, why this is problematic, and how it can be addressed.

The New Cold War

Russia is expanding its influence in the Arctic Circle as ice recedes and natural resources become accessible. This represents a potential threat which the US must recognize.

Sanctions are Driving Market Reforms in North Korea

The United States faces pressure from South Korea to ease sanctions on North Korea in hopes it will speed liberalizing reforms. This would be a mistake.