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What Policies Are Succeeding Against The Coronavirus?

An examination of three countries—Taiwan, Germany, and the United States—and their responses to the global pandemic reveals what’s working, what’s not, and what’s in store.

Parasite’s Triumph is a Victory for International Cinema, but Has a Precedent Really Been Set?

Winning Best Picture this year, Parasite becomes the first international film to do so. This article examines the impact this may have for future foreign films and whether the US is at the precipice of a new relationship with international cinema.

For a True ‘Geopolitical Commission’ the EU Must Put Its Money Where Its Mouth Is

The outcome of the EU’s negotiations around its next long-term budget will have a pivotal effect on the bloc’s ambitions to become a stronger geopolitical actor on the global stage. To make these ambitions a reality, the bloc’s leaders must reconsider their spending priorities.

China’s Penghu Island Annexation Shows Taiwan Was Never Too Far Off

The Chinese Navy has surrounded the Penghu Islands, located kilometers off the Taiwanese coast. Seen as a warning and a rebuke to Taiwan’s recent rapid foreign policy shift away from China, this piece examines what China might want and how Taiwan can respond.

Are We Witnessing an African Spring?

Anti-Kagame protests are sweeping Rwanda just weeks before the 2024 general election. Taken in conjunction with movements in Uganda and Zimbabwe, Rwandan activism represents the latest iteration of a regional rejection of dictatorial rule.

What Policies Are Succeeding Against The Coronavirus?

By Jonathan Stutte | March 30, 2020

An examination of three countries—Taiwan, Germany, and the United States—and their responses to the global pandemic reveals what’s working, what’s not, and what’s in store.

Parasite’s Triumph is a Victory for International Cinema, but Has a Precedent Really Been Set?

By Timothy Meyers | March 26, 2020

Winning Best Picture this year, Parasite becomes the first international film to do so. This article examines the impact this may have for future foreign films and whether the US is at the precipice of a new relationship with international cinema.

For a True ‘Geopolitical Commission’ the EU Must Put Its Money Where Its Mouth Is

By Nick Lokker | March 26, 2020

The outcome of the EU’s negotiations around its next long-term budget will have a pivotal effect on the bloc’s ambitions to become a stronger geopolitical actor on the global stage. To make these ambitions a reality, the bloc’s leaders must reconsider their spending priorities.

China’s Penghu Island Annexation Shows Taiwan Was Never Too Far Off

By Jonathan Stutte | March 23, 2020

The Chinese Navy has surrounded the Penghu Islands, located kilometers off the Taiwanese coast. Seen as a warning and a rebuke to Taiwan’s recent rapid foreign policy shift away from China, this piece examines what China might want and how Taiwan can respond.

Are We Witnessing an African Spring?

By Kathryn Urban | March 23, 2020

Anti-Kagame protests are sweeping Rwanda just weeks before the 2024 general election. Taken in conjunction with movements in Uganda and Zimbabwe, Rwandan activism represents the latest iteration of a regional rejection of dictatorial rule.

Recommitting to NATO, Resisting Putin’s Aggression

By Michael Purzycki | March 16, 2020

Questioning assumptions about war, and remaining committed to NATO, prepared the United States to stare down a Russian march toward Kyiv.

China’s Geocultural Influence Reaches New Heights as the U.S. Fades from View

By Shannon McNaught | March 16, 2020

As we mark the first year since the United States’ withdrawal from UNESCO, what does the future hold for American geocultural influence and who is waiting in the wings to fill the void?

Partnering for Peace: The U.S. Will Need Help with North Korea

By Jonathan Stutte | March 16, 2020

Should United States President Donald Trump be reelected this November, his biggest obstacle to a successful North Korean foreign policy will be achieving cooperation with necessary partners China and South Korea.

Responsibility to Protect: The Case for a Global Park System

By Michael Hogan | March 16, 2020

It’s 2030 and states have failed as stewards of Earth. We must take seriously our responsibility to protect this planet and its natural wonders by establishing a global park system.

No Peace for Afghanistan

By Dylan Johnson | March 9, 2020

Summary: The 2020 U.S.-Taliban agreement and subsequent U.S. troop withdrawal established conditions for a lasting war between the Taliban and Afghan government. Both too weak to dominate, there is no end in sight.

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Adam Ratzlaff

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